The euro is fragile; that’s OK

June 2022 • Wyplosz Charles

Analysis

The EU’s Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) is far from perfect. But it is a unique achievement, and it has weathered all the economic and political storms of its existence so far. It will in all likelihood continue to do so, writes Charles Wyplosz, economist and Emeritus Professor at the Graduate Institute, Geneva, as he assesses proposals to safeguard the future of the euro, and makes some of his own. (2022:13epa)

Making EU Representative Democracy Fit for the Future

June 2022 • Crum Ben , Kreilinger Valentin , Lord Christopher , Puntscher Riekmann Sonja , von Sydow Göran

Report

Long criticized as deficient, the EU’s democratic system now finds itself threatened – as do national systems – by populism, technocracy, and rival forms of government. The essays in this collection suggest how EU representative democracy could change in order to survive and perform effectively. Contributions by Ben Crum, Valentin Kreilinger, Christopher Lord, Sonja Puntscher Riekmann, and Göran von Sydow. (2022:2op)

A Green Deal, Open to the World

May 2022 • Engström Mats

Analysis

From carbon tariffs to energy taxes, the EU’s climate and environment policies have consequences across the world, and Europe is dependent on the rest of the world for raw materials, investment and expertise for its green transition. The package as a whole, argues SIEPS Senior Advisor Mats Engström, is unlikely to succeed without more engagement, especially with countries in the Global South. (2022:10epa)

The Costs of War: how tariffs could help Europe give up Russian oil and gas

May 2022 • Lenk Hannes

Perspective

The EU is struggling to agree sanctions on Russian energy supplies. By applying tariffs to oil and gas imports from Russia the Union could protect its energy security during a phase-out, while preventing Russia from financing its war in Ukraine. This could be agreed by qualified majority, and would mean the EU’s trade policy was aligned with its values, interests and obligations, argues Hannes Lenk, Senior Researcher in Law at SIEPS. (May 2022)

EU Crisis Management

April 2022 • Kreuder-Sonnen Christian , Schmidt Vivien A. , Séville Astrid , Wetter Ryde Anna , White Jonathan

Report

From the sovereign debt crisis to the COVID-19 pandemic and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the EU has taken a leading role in the management of crises. The essays in this anthology analyse the EU’s performance and suggest how it could improve as a ‘crisis manager’. Contributions by Christian Kreuder-Sonnen, Vivien A. Schmidt, Astrid Séville and Jonathan White. (2022:1op)

New Funds for the EU: the Case for a Market Access Fee

April 2022 • Tarschys Daniel

Analysis

The EU and its Member States face many challenges, from security and migration to innovation and climate change. Some are existential, all require some common effort, and all are expensive to address. Against that background, SIEPS senior advisor Daniel Tarschys examines options for boosting the EU’s finances and makes the case for an EU Market Access Fee. (2022:7epa)

The partisan dimension of the Conference on the Future of Europe: Agenda-setting, objectives and influence

March 2022 • Johansson Karl Magnus , Raunio Tapio

Report

The Conference on the Future of Europe invites the citizens of the EU to debate the future of the Union. But other EU actors and institutions are involved in the intiative. This SIEPS report investigates the influence of the ‘Europarties’ on the Conference’s agenda and its work. Karl Magnus Johansson and Tapio Raunio are both professors of political science. (2022:2)

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